Posts tagged “photo

A year in photos… 2012

Well, it’s that time of year again where I like to reflect back on my photographic year and look at my favourite shots from each month.

January
There was quite a few shots from January I liked but this one was the big performer. This shot went sort of viral after I uploaded it getting in excess of 10000 views in under 24 hours on Blipfoto and Flickr. This was a mere hint of aurora taken from Blackford Hill looking over towards Arthurs Seat. It was a lucky catch truth be told with all that cloud about.

Aurora over Edinburgh

February
2012 was the year I really got into the astro-photography and there was no more engaging subject than the International Space Station. Orbiting the Earth every 90 minutes or so, 200 miles up and moving at 17,5000mph all with humans on board. It’s mind boggling you can see this pass so easily from your back garden. This shot was taken in the Pentland Hills and shows the Moon, Venus, Jupiter and the trail of the ISS passing over.

Moon Venus Jupiter ISS Feb 24 2012

March
This shot was featured on the BBC Scotland website in their feature of the conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. This was taken in North Queensferry looking at the planets over the top of the Road Bridge just minutes before an almighty blizzard hit.

Jupiter and Venus over the Forth Road Bridge

April
Rain was very much the theme for the year in Scotland but thankfully I managed to avoid the worst of it until this shot. I just came over the top of Blackford Hill and was met with this view, it was so epic I stayed far too long and ended up soaked. Worth it for a nice pic though!

Storm over Edinburgh

May
I got my first proper telescope in May and got to work frustrating the life out of myself planetary imaging. It’s such a difficult form of photography but oh so rewarding when you get a result, this might not look like much but the learning that went into getting this little shot of Saturn was huge and I was over the moon to get a chance to image the most awesome thing you will ever see though a telescope.

Saturn 26 May 2012

June
The rains were kicking in big time by June. Photography time was limited to say the least and astro stuff was even worse with the near constant cloud cover. This shot represented a rare trip out for a sunset.

Sunset on the Forth 18 June 2012 - Explored

July
And the rains continued into July. Edinburgh had it’s worst flooding for 10 years and I spent a day soaked to the bum cheeks capturing it. This was the Meadows slowly being turned back into the South loch.

Meadows Flooded 7 July 2012

A special mention should go to this shot as well, the Red Arrows doing the Olympic flypast over Edinburgh Castle.

Red Arrows Olympic Flypast 27 July 2012

August
Again, this might not look like much but this is the International Space Station. This took several nights to get and I never attempted it again after this shot as it was simply too difficult!
ISS 14 August 2012

September
September was a good month. There was so many pics to choose from but this was the standout for the month. A real shot from nothing. The weather wasn’t great, there were spots of rain about and I only just got to Belhaven Bay in time for the sunset and high tide just for the clouds to part and an amazing sunset to kick in.

Belhaven Sunset 21 Sept 2012

October
So many shots I loved from October but this is the shot that sent my little Facebook page from an also ran to, well, something a lot bigger. This went viral on Facebook and got over 12000 likes in 24 hours. In fact it was just one from an incredible night on Calton Hill with the best sunset I have ever seen.

Sunset of the year, 9 October 2012

Although that pic was the one that got me noticed, I prefered this one.
Calton Sunset 9 October 2012

Then there was the chance Moon-rise from Blackford Hill too…
Moonrise over East Lothian

And how about the panoramic shot the same night with the belt of Venus providing some nice colour?
Edinburgh Skyline and Belt of Venus

Or the Autumn on the Canal shot used for a charity calendar?
Autumn on the Canal

November
Again so hard to pick, November was another good month!

How about the bus trails on Princes Street?
Bus Stop Trails 4 November 2012

The Newhaven sunset?
Newhaven Sunset 3 Nov 2012

The 22 degree Moon halo with Jupiter?
Moon Halo 1 November 2012

Or the perfect morning at the Forth Bridges?
Forth Bridge winter high tide

Forth Bridge Reflections

December
December has started well too. I think the standout so far though is the shot of the Edinburgh Winter Wonderland from the ramparts of Edinburgh Castle on a very very cold afternoon.

Edinburgh's Wonderland 2 December 2012

So that’s mine, what about the rest of you?

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Top Edinburgh autumn photography locations

Ah, Autumn, thank god it’s here at last. Whatever it throws at us it can’t be worse than the soggy summer of 2012. In photographic terms at least, the next couple of months are great for getting out with the camera. Sunset and sunrise are at sociable times, nice dark (hoepfully clear skies) and the trees turning those fantastic golden shades.

So here you are in Edinburgh, what’s the hot shots to try out the next couple of months?

Lets kick off with the top sunset location for Autumn in Edinburgh and it’s predictably Calton Hill. At this time of year the sun in heading back towards the Castle at sunset meaning all those fantastic cityscapes can benefit from the full burst of colour from the setting sun.

Calton Hill Sunset 31 August 2010 - Explored

Don’t forget the twilight too from up here, any direction is good, why not try Leith at twilight for something a little different?

Leith Dusk

Sticking with Calton Hill, the just after sunrise the National Mounment will be casting some nice shadows. Get up there early though, too late and the sun will be in the way of the shot.

Unfinished Shadows

Seafront locations are not at their best at this time of year for sunsets but the Cramond causeway can provide a nice sunrise.

Cramond Sunrise

On 5th October, the sunset at high tide at both at exactly 6.31pm, with a 5m tide it’s a perfect night to head out to Belhaven Bay outside Dunbar for the Bridge to Nowhere shot.

The Belhaven Bridge to Nowhere

It’s getting a little late in the year but 8th October might be a good night to try and catch the advancing tide at the Longniddry wreck found just off the number 1 carpark.

Longniddry Sunset - Explored

Nearer the end of October with the moon out the way it might be a good chance to try for the Milky Way before it slinks off for the summer, try the carpark at Harlaw Reservoir about 2 hours after sunset, give your eyes time to adjust and you should see the dense star cloud that forms the band of the Milky Way just off to the south west.

Milky Way at Harlaw 11 September 2012

There’s obvioulsy quite a few fireworks opportunities around November 5th but keep and eye open for the South Queensferry display for a chance to catch them over water.

Fireworks in the Ferry

There might also be a display at the Castle for St Andrews day, though possible not exactly on 30th November and it’s likely to be short display too.

Homecoming Scotland Fireworks Edinburgh - Explored

With the darker nights it’s also a pefect time to try those light trails shots, with Princes Street open again it’s an obvious choice but anywhere with traffic is possible, why not try Holyrood Park about 30 minutes after sunset?

Holyrood X

It’s also a good time to get those star trails shots in, Newhaven lighthouse, is a cold but worthy spot as you can get Polaris in the shot.

Newhaven Star Trails

Hopefully that little lot will give you some ideas for Edinburgh photography over the next few months!


Garden Safari Photography

Summer is a time of mixed emotions for me. Sure, the nicer (!) weather is welcome and overall more pleasing temperatures but it’s also a time I ease off on any landscape photography. The daylight is harsh, the sunrise is too early, the sunset is too late and let be honest here, it does rain a lot in a typical Scottish summer. That’s why every year around June to August my attention turns mainly to macro photography.

The summer months are bumper months for macro lens usage, more flowers about and in turn, more insects which are my principal targets for close up shots. Living in Edinburgh with the Botanic Gardens just a 15 minute drive away is pretty fortunate, especially for floral stuff but it’s amazing what you can find with a little wander around your garden or any nearby grassy/bushy area.

Insect life in particular is rife at this time of year and if you know where to look then you’ll have a myriad of subjects close at hand. I have a particular patch in my back garden where some wildflowers grow; I leave this deliberately as every summer it’s teaming with potential macro subjects but any bush or even hedge if you look close enough will turn up some interesting beasties.

Flies are the most abundant. Approach your chosen area with caution, keep back and just look. I mean, really look. You’ll almost certainly find some flies, particularly evening, while the sun in still up but not as hot as earlier in the day. Most flies are quite tolerant of an approach as long as you are stealthy and don’t rush in on them. Set the camera up well away from your target and move in slowly. Using a macro lens I like to find the subject in the viewfinder from far out and slowly move in increasing the magnification until I’m at full 1:1 on the lens. Now gently move until the subject in focus, you might have to rock back and forward a bit to get it, microscopic movements but as soon as you see focus in the viewfinder, take the shot.

Even with a flash you might be lucky enough to get a few goes at this. Using a ring flash and a setting of around f16 greatly helps with the depth of field and getting any sort of focus at all. Always focus on the eyes, if only one part of your shot in sharp you want it to be the eyes.

If your subject flies off, just pull back slowly and scan the immediate area, they don’t always move far at all. Hoverflies are particularly good as they will fly off and seconds later come back to exactly that same spot so don’t abandon immediately unless you find another target to try.

Other good places to look are as simple as the grass, you’ll often find insect life on a daisy and indeed any plant of any sort is worth checking out. Try to look for surfaces that have warmed up during the day. Wheelie bin lids, car roofs and plastic garden furniture are all spots where flies sit and funnily enough, clothes lines and pegs are places I’ve found loads in the past.

Other things like spiders like little hidey holes, try windowsill outsides, clothes poles, vegetation near a wall and you never know what will turn up.

In 5 minutes outside on a dull night I managed to photograph a few flies, a spider and a ladybird all less than 20ft from my front door. You really don’t need to travel far for macro photography, just stay where you are and eventually it’ll come to you!

All shots taken with a Nikon D7000, Sigma f2.8 105mm EX DG Macro and Marumi ring flash.

Spider Eyes

Ladybird3

Ladybird1

Fly


Sigma and a tale of excellent service

When I bought my D7000 I swore I would never buy another Sigma lens. It’s not the best when you get a nice new camera body and find issues with your lenses working with it which will always be an issue with 3rd party manufacturers.

Curiously, my Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 EX HSM which is now over 10 years old worked perfectly. However I lost AF in live view on my 10-20mm superwide but that wasn’t something that bothered me as that lens is nearly always MF only and I rarely ever use live view either.

The big problems started with my 28-300mm which was seen by the camera but just didn’t function at all. In the end I sold the lens on as I wasn’t that keen on it anyway but the real issue came with my Sigma 105mm f2.8 EX DG macro. Now, I love this lens. Every summer I cast off the shackles of landscape photography and delve head on into the wonderful world of plants and insects with the macro lens. It’s used a lot. The problem was though that the D7000 simply refused to even see the lens.

To say this hacked me off was an understatement. Sure, I still had my D90 where it worked perfectly but this lens was less than 3 years old and didn’t work with the new kit. I was so hacked off by this that when I was looking for a new mid range lens I totally discounted any Sigma product and went the extra mile for a Nikon 18-200mm VRII as hey, it’s a Nikon lens, and it’ll work for ever no matter what body I buy in future. Sure, it’s expensive but it won’t ever be obsolete.

Luckily though, Sigma DG products come with a 3 year warranty. No problem, send back to Sigma with the proof of purchase and they’ll re-chip it. Problem. No proof of purchase. I had bought it nearly 3 years ago and had no idea where the receipt would be. I phoned Jessops as I had bought the lens along with my D90 there and they couldn’t help. I emailed Jessops customer service and they did manage to locate a duplicate copy for me but when it arrived the date on the receipt was the day they had ran off the copy, not the original date of purchase.

I emailed Sigma again, expressing my displeasure that a less than 3 year old lens wasn’t working and explaining the proof of purchase issue. I had an email back asking me to phone their service supervisor which I did. In the end Sigma, with no persuasion needed offered to re-chip the lens in an act of goodwill even with no proof of purchase, something they didn’t have to do.

The lens was sent recorded delivery to Sigma in the UK and in only 5 days over a weekend too it arrived back re-chipped and cleaned too. Stuck on the D7000 and it worked like a dream. So there you go, in this day and age when the consumer now expects to be shafted silly there are sill a few companies out there giving decent service. My faith in the Sigma brand is restored and I wouldn’t hesitate to buy Sigma again, I always felt they were better built than the more expensive Nikon lenses anyway.

Now, my less than 2 year old original iPad can’t run some apps and it cost more than the lens did. Wonder what Apple’s response would be if I asked them to upgrade it?


Adapting to the conditions, photography in the rain

]It’s been a funny old couple of weeks weather wise in Scotland. We’ve gone from sitting in the garden in shorts and t-shirt to snow, hail, torrential rain and even thunder and lightning. One thing about the Scottish climate, it certainly keeps you on your toes.

It’s been a very mixed bag for me photography wise. On one hand for astrophotography I want totally clear skies but for landscape I’d prefer a cloudy sky or at least some clouds in the sky. Clouds give you options, slow the exposure down and you can streak the clouds, or if you’re lucky enough to get huge high contrast clouds it can give a shot real drama. Clouds also help a sunset along no end; a slightly cloudy sky will always yield a better sunset than a clear sky will.

The last couple of days though have been really challenging, mainly due to the one thing that can stop play. Rain. Rain can be a real pain in the back end, water on the camera gear isn’t usually desirable although less of an issue with weatherproofed DSLR’s. It’s entirely possible to get some decent shots in rain though, you just need to adapt to the conditions. Remember too, rain can also come with extreme weather and nothing makes a better shot than extreme weather!

Certainly though, rain will stop you using filters, unless you want to sit cloning out rain drops on your shots for days on end. In these conditions I find it best to go simple. Shoot handheld, with the lens hood on and just bring the camera out when you want to take a shot. Balancing exposures will of course be an issue but there’s another weapon at your disposal here. HDR.

There, I said it. That dirty photography word, HDR. “Stone him” I hear you all cry. But wait! Why not? I’ve hardly used HDR for the last 18 months but the last couple of days it’s been a useful style to adopt. HDR is really down to personal taste but if done tastefully then I can’t see any reason why not? A bad shot will still look like a pile of poo in HDR but a good shot can look particularly pleasing if done properly.

My bad weather method of shooting HDR is as follows.

1. Low as ISO as you can, HDR always works better with a low ISO, I try to stick to ISO200 or lower.
2. Shoot 3 bracketed shots for everything, +2, 0 and -2ev. Most DSLR’s have an auto bracketing feature.
3. Turn on your high speed drive and if you have it vibration reduction, image stabilization or whatever it’s called on your camera.
4. Frame the shot, focus and press the shutter until you hear all 3 shots rattled off.

It’ll take about as long as a blink of the eye and you should have 3 shots, sharp, bracketed and not that far off the same position. Use features matching in Photomatix when you’re combining the exposures and you should be fine.

I like to bump up the contrast in Photoshop of HDR shots after the tone mapping is finished; I feel it gives a cleaner look with more tonal depth. Tone mapped images can look a little bland to me and bumping up the contrast finishes off a shot how I like it.

While you’re getting your shots though, do try to keep the lens pointed down when you’re not shooting and keep a close eye open for rain drops on the front lens element. They might not be that noticeable on the preview screen but they’ll be the cause of much wailing and gnashing of teeth if you find them once the pics are downloaded.

These shots were all taken in rain the last 2 days using a Nikon D7000 and Nikon 18-200mm VRII lens. All are 3 exposures combined in Photomatix Pro 4 and finished in Photoshop.

Forth Bridge in the Rain

Storm Clouds over the Bridge

Pier and Bridge

Crags to Calton Hill



Getting out of the print sales rat-race

After 2 years online with my own website aimed at selling prints of my work I’ve decided to give it up. On 20th of Feb this year, Photos of Edinburgh will cease to be, in it’s current form at least. I’ll retain the domain and maybe even just point it towards this blog but I’m ceasing trying to make print sales any more.

The reasons is simple. There’s no market at all for an amateur to make any decent money from print sales. In an age where anyone can buy a SLR, set up a cheap WordPress website and register their name with “photography” at the end of it as a domain, it’s a crowded market of dreamers and chancers and not a dead horse I want to keep flogging.

I licenced an image to an advertising company last year, in that one transaction (which came via Flickr) I made more profit than I did in 2 years, 4 redesign’s and god knows how many hours trying to promote my own little corner of the web. I’d be lucky to have even covered the cost of 2 years hosting and domain name renewal if I’m brutally honest.

I think most amateurs, when they get hooked on photography, go through that “I could make some serious cash here” stage. Unless you’re very lucky, I’d estimate 99% of people end up disappointed. A touch of realism is actually what’s required. Think about it, you’ve gone out and bought your fancy new camera. You’ve taken a few nice pics. Now you want to punt them for a decent price, but wait! Stop and hink about it, you’ve gone and bought that camera and taken that pic, what’s to stop anyone else doing the same? I mean, who doesn’t have or have access to a half decent digital camera these days? Click, trot off to Asda, stick the card in the machine, order the print for a fraction the cost of yours. Might not be as good but a fiver for a A3 print or £30+ for one of yours, the average punter will be more than happy with their own.

From here on it I’m stopping the self promotion with a view to profit. In the last year I’ve been shafted by a magazine, let down by others wanting work and ended up disappointed trying to get a deal to punt printed images locally. It’s simply not going to happen and it’s pointless to keep on. From here on it, photography is about the fun of it for me, not the potential profit. That’s not to say I’m going to pass up any opportunities that might fall into my lap but I’m certainly not going to going out looking for them in future.

Don’t get me wrong, I’ll happily wish “insert your name” Photography out there all the best with their endevours but unless you’re a full time pro photographer who’s very living depends on making those sales you will likely never put the effort in to make the sale as the need for it isn’t there. The pro who’s job it is will pull out all the stops to generate the income, me? I’m a web developer, that’s what pays the mortgage and puts food on the table, that’s where I’ll concentrate the effort, photography will be my escape from that, not an extension of it.


High’s and Low’s with Fireworks Photography

The big problem with photographing fireworks displays in Edinburgh is trying to get something that’s not been done 100 times before. This year along we’ve had the half hour display from Edinburgh Castle for the Festival, a shorter display from the castle for St Andrews Day, a display from Calton Hill as part of the Hogmanay celebrations and just over 24 hours later, another huge display from the castle again at midnight for New Year. That’s quite a lot of opportunities with iconic landmarks.

For the Festival display I trudged high up on Salisbury Crags with what felt like 10 tones of camera gear but nailed the shots I wanted so it was all worth it.

Festival Fireworks 18
Nikon D90 with 18-70mm lens set for a wider shot of the city with the fireworks at the castle.

Festival Fireworks 1
Closer shot with a Nikon D7000 and Sigma 70-200 f2.8 lens.

The St Andrews Day display though was another matter. With no firm time for the display and a strong biting wind I had gave up on my Calton Hill location thinking they had been cancelled, thankfully when I realised that hadn’t I was only down by Regent Road so did get some shots, nothing I’d describe as killer though.

St Andrews Day Fireworks 2011 - Explored
Shot with a Nikon D7000 and Sigma 70-200mm f2.8

Ok, so it’s not bad and the Bank building in the shot rather than the castle is different but it’s not the shot I wanted, not the best of nights.

Next big chance was the Son et Lumiere on Calton Hill, the end of the Hogmanay torchlight procession. In previous years I’ve shot this from the hillside itself from the back of the 10,000 strong crowd but have never been that pleased with the results.

This year I decided to try something different. Earlier in the year I took some shots from the Holyrood side of the Radical Road around Salisbury Crags trying to get traffic light trails with a backdrop of the Parliament and Calton Hill. The idea struck me, why not try and combine the two? So that’s what I did. 2 cameras set up, D7000 with the Sigma 70-200mm shooting Calton close in in portrait format, the D90 with the Nikon 18-200mm lens shooting the wide scene on 15s exposures to get the light trails and the fireworks. And guess what? It worked. Exactly the shot I wanted and something I’ve not seen done before.

Son et lumiere 9

The good times didn’t last though. For the big New Year celebration fireworks I had scouted out an easy access location with a clear view to the front side of the castle. Trouble was, this was a daylight scouting mission and on arriving at the location with no time to get anywhere else, the error I had made was obvious. There’s a rugby club here and they had strong security lights on their clubhouse, right in front of the castle which caused a load of issues with light flares on both cameras.

To say this was a nightmare was an understatement, I had to spend the whole display fiddling with settings and compositions and came away with nothing I was happy with at all. Eventually I had to resort to blending two fireworks bursts together and then blending in another shot of the castle before the display to get anything approaching a usable shot. I’m not that happy with the results, it looks too perfect. No smoke obscuring the castle is the big give away. To the man in the street it’s a good shot but to a semi knowledgeable photographer, it’s a dirty big fake and that doesn’t sit that easily with me.

New Year Fireworks 2012

So, lessons learned?

Scout out new locations at night.
Use your existing shots for inspiration for locations and techniques.
Get all the info you can on the display.
Use 2 cameras on different settings if at all possible.

I’ve got a few months now before there will be anymore, I just hope I remember the lessons learned by then!


The easy guide to photographing star trails

So, star trails. Striking images certainly but surprisingly easy to do with the right software.

First things first, to make your life a million times easier, if you’re using a Mac, download StarStax and on a PC, Startrails.exe, Google them, easy to find and both a free download. This is the software that will combine your final set of images into the star trails shot. If you really enjoy spending ages with Photoshop you can blend each image separately but these make life a lot easier.

Other than that all you need is a camera capable of doing 30s exposures, a tripod, remote control and a nice dark area where you can see plenty of stars. Don’t underestimate the power of light pollution to ruin a shot, the example below was taken in my garden in a built up area of Edinburgh, the light pollution is easy to see so try and get out of town somewhere.

The effects of light pollution

With everything in place you now need to locate Polaris. It’s not essential but if you can keep Polaris in the image then the stars will nicely rotate around it. To find it look for the Plough, one of the more well known star clusters. It’s in the shape of a soup ladle (roughly) so follow the handle around to the scoop and locate the last 2 stars in the Plough. From there in a straight line around 3 times as far away as the 2 stars are from each other will be a slightly duller star, this is Polaris. Or even easier, get one of the smartphone apps such as Star Walk on the iPhone and use that to locate Polaris.

With this done compose your image. You want a 30s exposure that doesn’t overexpose any foreground interest but shows up a lot of stars in the preview image. Usually you’ll be around f7.1 or wider and ISO400 or above to get what you want. The more stars you see on the preview, the more trails you’ll get in the final image. Shoot in RAW mode too if possible. I’ve also found that the wider the lens the better. You’ll want to be on manual focus, and with focus set to infinity.

Once you’re happy with the shot it’s time to settle in for the long haul. You’ll need at least 40 shots to get a decent trail in your final image. The more the better but you’ll be there longer to get them. A decent compromise is around 60 shots if you are picking up a lot of stars. You’ll either need to fire the shutter every 30s or if you have a programmable remote set it to 30s exposure with 32s delay to give the camera time to process each image.

With your shots in the bag, it’s time to thaw out and start the process magic.

First thing to do is to process the first RAW image, how you do it is personal preference but make sure that you get a decent mix of stars in the sky, the sky kept darker and don’t blow out any foreground. Once you have a image you’re happy with, save the settings and then process every image with the same settings. It doesn’t take that long to do with ACR or Lightroom, and save each as a jpg.

Now, open all the jpg’s in your processing software, either StarStax or Startrails.exe and start it off processing them using blend lighter to combine the images. After less than a minute you’ll have the stacked image. If you find cloud has passed through the shot you can exclude these images and start again but remember you’ll get breaks in your trails. Best plan in this case is to try and blend again missing the offending frames and see if it’s any better, sometimes the cloud doesn’t matter that much.

Save the final image and open it in Photoshop or similar. From here you can do your final adjustments, usually darkening the sky, upping contrast and that it, and this is what you should get…

FRB Star Trails 29 Dec

This panoramic shot was slightly different to do. Had I shot this with the bridges at the bottom of the shot the verticals of the bridges would have been hugely distorted, to get around this I shot a single long exposure image with the bridges in the middle of the frame where the distortion isn’t an issue. I then moved the camera to where I wanted the bridges in the final shot and shot the multiple star images. I finally took the long exposure image, moved the bridges to the bottom of the shot and extended the sky with content aware fill, I then blended in the star trails image and selectively erased the bridges until I had the correct verticals version overlaid with the star trails. A bit more mucking about but a much more pleasing final image.

Forth Bridges Pano Star Trails

So, a final checklist…

Warm clothes if doing this in winter, a simple MUST have.
Sturdy tripod
Camera capable of 30s exposures
As wide a lens as possible
StarStax or Startrails.exe software
Remote control for camera
A clear night
A dark(ish) location

That’s it. Off you go and shoot those stars!


A year in pictures, month by month

As we near the end of the year I’m going to take a look back over the last year and pick my favourite shots each month. I’d love to see what other photographers rated as their best shots by month too!

January

The year started well as I’d make the decision to shun the traditional Scottish Hogmany in favour of staying sober so I could get some shots of the fireworks from Edinburgh Castle at midnight. Standing on Bruntsfield Links stone cold sober while all around you could hardly stand was “interesting” to say the least, at least I got this shot as way of compensation.

Edinburgh Hogmanay Fireworks 2011 - FP, Explore #2

February

February was a pretty difficult month for me personally, as I spent most of it ill, a culmination of 5 months of feeling like crap. The intense low temperatures in February didn’t help although with the Western Harbour frozen solid it did let me get some killer reflections in the ice.

Western Harbour Reflections

March

March was the month of the “Supermoon”, although cloud cover did all it could to scupper any chances of a decent shot. Funnily enough it was a freak weather condition that sorted out my favourite for March. This shot from Calton Hill after some late winter snow was sheer chance. 10 minutes before it was clear and 5 minutes after it was clear again, for 5 minutes the Castle disappeared into the fog.

There used to be a castle there

April

April was the start of my long exposure period. A Helipoan 10 stopper was bought and the long exposures commenced. To be fair I really enjoyed it at the time but couldn’t see past it. Everything had to be at least 60s exposures or it wasn’t good enough. I did get some nice shots out of it though, of which this of the Falkirk Wheel was one.

On Top of the Falkirk Wheel

May

Still in long exposure mode I found the bridge to nowhere in Behlaven Bay near Dunbar. It took a few trips to get high enough tides but finally I got a shot of the water all round the bridge.

Belhaven Bridge Revisted 2

June

In June, I finally figured out how to time the tides at the Cramond causeway so I could catch the tide coming in from down at the water’s edge. After several goes and wet feet to be going on with, I had this shot in the bag.

Timing of the tide - Explored

July

July was a good month. A lot happened including the mother of all thunderstorms over Edinburgh. The shot of the anvil cloud retreating over the Pentlands was a tempting pick for this month but July was really about macro for me, and this may well be one of my favourite ever macro shots, taken in the Botanic Gardens lying flat on my back in the dirt getting funny looks from all around…

A Brace of Coneflower

August

August was a hard month to choose but this had to be the shot for the month. Probably one of the best I’ve ever taken and the first trip out with my new Nikon D7000.

Newhaven Cobbles - Explored

September

September was all about the Festival Fireworks or Leuchars Airshow. The Red Arrows pip the fireworks to the post for me, quite an awesome sight.

Red Arrows Leuchars 2011

October

This was an easy winner for October. I’d been playing about with twisting the zoom during long exposure shots and this was the result down on a still night at the Victoria Quay with the Scottish Executive building, a single exposure!

Scottish Executive Streaks

November

We got the best sunset I’ve ever seen one night in November and was lucky enough to be up on Calton Hill waiting for it. This was the pick of the bunch from that night.

November Sunset from Calton Hill

December

No contest here, December was the first time I had really tried to do a star trails shot and this was the result. 100 30s exposures over 50 minutes blended to get the final result.

Forth Bridge Star Trail - Explored