Posts tagged “macro

Garden Safari Photography

Summer is a time of mixed emotions for me. Sure, the nicer (!) weather is welcome and overall more pleasing temperatures but it’s also a time I ease off on any landscape photography. The daylight is harsh, the sunrise is too early, the sunset is too late and let be honest here, it does rain a lot in a typical Scottish summer. That’s why every year around June to August my attention turns mainly to macro photography.

The summer months are bumper months for macro lens usage, more flowers about and in turn, more insects which are my principal targets for close up shots. Living in Edinburgh with the Botanic Gardens just a 15 minute drive away is pretty fortunate, especially for floral stuff but it’s amazing what you can find with a little wander around your garden or any nearby grassy/bushy area.

Insect life in particular is rife at this time of year and if you know where to look then you’ll have a myriad of subjects close at hand. I have a particular patch in my back garden where some wildflowers grow; I leave this deliberately as every summer it’s teaming with potential macro subjects but any bush or even hedge if you look close enough will turn up some interesting beasties.

Flies are the most abundant. Approach your chosen area with caution, keep back and just look. I mean, really look. You’ll almost certainly find some flies, particularly evening, while the sun in still up but not as hot as earlier in the day. Most flies are quite tolerant of an approach as long as you are stealthy and don’t rush in on them. Set the camera up well away from your target and move in slowly. Using a macro lens I like to find the subject in the viewfinder from far out and slowly move in increasing the magnification until I’m at full 1:1 on the lens. Now gently move until the subject in focus, you might have to rock back and forward a bit to get it, microscopic movements but as soon as you see focus in the viewfinder, take the shot.

Even with a flash you might be lucky enough to get a few goes at this. Using a ring flash and a setting of around f16 greatly helps with the depth of field and getting any sort of focus at all. Always focus on the eyes, if only one part of your shot in sharp you want it to be the eyes.

If your subject flies off, just pull back slowly and scan the immediate area, they don’t always move far at all. Hoverflies are particularly good as they will fly off and seconds later come back to exactly that same spot so don’t abandon immediately unless you find another target to try.

Other good places to look are as simple as the grass, you’ll often find insect life on a daisy and indeed any plant of any sort is worth checking out. Try to look for surfaces that have warmed up during the day. Wheelie bin lids, car roofs and plastic garden furniture are all spots where flies sit and funnily enough, clothes lines and pegs are places I’ve found loads in the past.

Other things like spiders like little hidey holes, try windowsill outsides, clothes poles, vegetation near a wall and you never know what will turn up.

In 5 minutes outside on a dull night I managed to photograph a few flies, a spider and a ladybird all less than 20ft from my front door. You really don’t need to travel far for macro photography, just stay where you are and eventually it’ll come to you!

All shots taken with a Nikon D7000, Sigma f2.8 105mm EX DG Macro and Marumi ring flash.

Spider Eyes

Ladybird3

Ladybird1

Fly


Sigma and a tale of excellent service

When I bought my D7000 I swore I would never buy another Sigma lens. It’s not the best when you get a nice new camera body and find issues with your lenses working with it which will always be an issue with 3rd party manufacturers.

Curiously, my Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 EX HSM which is now over 10 years old worked perfectly. However I lost AF in live view on my 10-20mm superwide but that wasn’t something that bothered me as that lens is nearly always MF only and I rarely ever use live view either.

The big problems started with my 28-300mm which was seen by the camera but just didn’t function at all. In the end I sold the lens on as I wasn’t that keen on it anyway but the real issue came with my Sigma 105mm f2.8 EX DG macro. Now, I love this lens. Every summer I cast off the shackles of landscape photography and delve head on into the wonderful world of plants and insects with the macro lens. It’s used a lot. The problem was though that the D7000 simply refused to even see the lens.

To say this hacked me off was an understatement. Sure, I still had my D90 where it worked perfectly but this lens was less than 3 years old and didn’t work with the new kit. I was so hacked off by this that when I was looking for a new mid range lens I totally discounted any Sigma product and went the extra mile for a Nikon 18-200mm VRII as hey, it’s a Nikon lens, and it’ll work for ever no matter what body I buy in future. Sure, it’s expensive but it won’t ever be obsolete.

Luckily though, Sigma DG products come with a 3 year warranty. No problem, send back to Sigma with the proof of purchase and they’ll re-chip it. Problem. No proof of purchase. I had bought it nearly 3 years ago and had no idea where the receipt would be. I phoned Jessops as I had bought the lens along with my D90 there and they couldn’t help. I emailed Jessops customer service and they did manage to locate a duplicate copy for me but when it arrived the date on the receipt was the day they had ran off the copy, not the original date of purchase.

I emailed Sigma again, expressing my displeasure that a less than 3 year old lens wasn’t working and explaining the proof of purchase issue. I had an email back asking me to phone their service supervisor which I did. In the end Sigma, with no persuasion needed offered to re-chip the lens in an act of goodwill even with no proof of purchase, something they didn’t have to do.

The lens was sent recorded delivery to Sigma in the UK and in only 5 days over a weekend too it arrived back re-chipped and cleaned too. Stuck on the D7000 and it worked like a dream. So there you go, in this day and age when the consumer now expects to be shafted silly there are sill a few companies out there giving decent service. My faith in the Sigma brand is restored and I wouldn’t hesitate to buy Sigma again, I always felt they were better built than the more expensive Nikon lenses anyway.

Now, my less than 2 year old original iPad can’t run some apps and it cost more than the lens did. Wonder what Apple’s response would be if I asked them to upgrade it?