The Astrophotography learning curve begins…

I wouldn’t call what I’ve been doing up until know as “actual” astrophotography. Sure, I’ve been snapping away at all manner of astro related subjects, planets, moons, sun, star clusters, conjunctions, earthshine, aurora, milky way, ISS to name but a few but it’s all been done on a photographic tripod and with the restrictions that brings. Not that it hasn’t been highly enjoyable, it has and it was quite cool to get into this utilising the camera kit I already had but I really wanted to get deeper into the hobby.

With that in mind I started to seriously look at getting a telescope around February. What I found though was an utterly bewildering array of kit on offer that made my head spin every time I looked at it. I spent hour pouring over telescopes on Amazon having to go off and Google all manner of things. What the hell was an alt-az mount, en EQ mount, what’s the difference from an EQ2 to an EQ6, focal lengths, aperture, motor drives and what’s this? Using a webcam???

It was too much to take in initially and with a fear of buying crap I backed off and bought nothing. I put the thoughts of telescopes out my head totally and thought about getting hold of a Sigma 150-500mm lens instead. Coupled with the 2x it would make it a 1000mm lens and I’d have other uses for a lens that size but then by chance I spotted a 2nd hand Meade 4504 telescope on an EQ mount for £80 for sale locally.

The Meade was a disappointment and a revelation at the same time. When I got it home on closer inspection it had had a hard life. The mount wasn’t working properly; it couldn’t be locked in place at all. The motor drives didn’t function either but the OTA was fine. I couldn’t get the camera to focus with it either so I sold it on quickly. What it did do though was take my breath away when I simply used it for observing. From that first night when I properly used it and saw Jupiter and its moons, Saturn and the Orion nebula I knew I had to get something better.

It took another few months of research until I fully understood what I needed. I had a rough budget of £500 and had to get the best from that I could. Initial plans for a Skymax 127 Mak on a GOTO alt-az where discounted when I realised that the alt-az would be great for getting going fast but it would end up frustrating me. No, I had to do this right. It had to be a heavy EQ mount; it seemed pointless going for anything else if I was going to try this properly.

Finally I settled on a Skywatcher Explorer 200P, an 8″ Newtonian reflector sat on an EQ5 mount. It gave me a nice mixture of sturdy EQ mount and a decent sized telescope. At £400 it wasn’t cheap and the SynScan goto version would have bust the budget by a lot so I also got the Skywatcher dual drive motors for the EQ5, all in just under the £500 budget.


Not the best pic, I’ll get better soon but it gives the idea!

Setup, it’s huge and pretty heavy. It’s certainly not a scope you’ll drag out for a quick 5 minutes viewing but I’m safe in the knowledge I’ve got kit that’s capable, once I know how to use it, to deliver what I want. Coming into summer there wasn’t a worse time to buy such an item but I hope to use the next few light months to get to grips with the new toy, learn that EQ mount and get used to the software that goes with astrophotography so when the winter rolls in again I’m prepared and ready to really start learning to image properly.

I’m in this for the long term now, prepared for the fact that it’s going to be a long and at time frustrating learning curve but I’m looking forward to it. If Edinburgh ever clears a clear night again I might even get my first shot of the moon through a telescope.

Here’s a quick artists impression of how I expect the sky over Edinburgh to look for the foreseeable future…

Keep following this blog for the forthcoming astrophotography related highs and more likely lows!

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